Ancient Literature, Classical World, Greco-Roman World

Ancient Authors Timeline

I’ve spent more time with ancient Greek and Roman authors in the last couple of years than I had in my entire lifetime (dissertation research). I didn’t study Classics in college—looking back I wish I had—so my knowledge of Greco-Roman literature was seriously minimal. Even now, several years in, I’m still barely a novice, if that. Anyway, one of the challenges of working with ancient sources is placing authors in their proper contexts, one of which is their historical milieu. Information about these authors and their works are plentiful to be sure, but one reference I’ve found tremendously helpful is from the folks at Harvard University Press—a timeline of ancient Greco-Roman authors.

If you’ve worked in Classics or are even a casual reader of the Loeb Classical Library, you probably already know about this. I found it helpful to have, so I thought I’d share it.

Ancient Authors Timeline

Ancient Literature, Classical World, Greco-Roman World, Greek

Wisdom from Ancient Greece

This poem by Babrius (first or second century CE) seems fitting for all generations.

War and His Bride

The gods were getting married, and when each was paired off,
War drew the last lot and came after everyone.
He married Hubris, who was the only one left.
He loved her excessively, they say,
and he still follows her everywhere she goes.

So may Hubris never come upon nations or
cities of men, smiling upon the people,
since War will come immediately after her.[1]

Θεῶν γαμούντων, ὡς ἕκαστος ἐζεύχθη, ἐφ᾿ ἅπασι Πόλεμος ἐσχάτῳ παρῆν κλήρῳ. Ὕβριν δὲ γήμας, ἣν μόνην κατειλήφει, ταύτης περισσῶς, ὡς λέγουσιν, ἠράσθη, ἕπεται δ᾿ ἔτ᾿ αὐτῇ πανταχοῦ βαδιζούσῃ.

Μήτ᾿ οὖν ποτ᾿ ἔθνη, μὴ πόληας ἀνθρώπων Ὕβρις <γ᾿> ἐπέλθοι, προσγελῶσα τοῖς δήμοις, ἐπεὶ μετ᾿ αὐτὴν Πόλεμος εὐθέως ἥξει.[2]

 

[1] Translation from Stephen M. Trzaskoma, R. Scott Smith, and Stephen Brunet, eds., Anthology of Classical Myth: Primary Sources in Translation (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2016), 61–62.

[2] Greek text from Babrius and Phaedrus: Fables, trans. Ben Edwing Perry, Loeb Classical Library 436 (Cambride, MA: Harvard University Press, 1965), 86.